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PROJECTS AND PARTNERSHIPS

The BGSNA is always on the lookout for new partners to collaborate with. Our members and partners are involved in various research projects, and we are excited to share them with you.

Take a look at our projects below to learn more and get involved!

Mystical garden

The Woods We All Walked Through: Fairy Tale Journeys

This project aims to collect voluntary stories from individuals about how the Grimm fairy tales have touched their lives and influenced them to this day.

Bremer Stadtmusikanten Monument

International Collaboration

BGSNA has joined forces with Cambridge Research Network for Fairy Tale Studies and the Australian Fairy Tale Society to created a database for international collaboration in the field of fairy-tale studies.

Calypso book

Healing Narratives: Fairy Tales for Brave Hearts

BGSNA supports Narrative Medicine, which uses storytelling in healthcare, specially with children. Sharing fairy tales with children reduces their stress and pain, while also encouraging them to open up about their own experiences.

Grimms Märchen Book cover

BBC Podcast:

A Cinderella Story

Through the story of a Cinderella film, this podcast explores the origins, meaning and persistence of cross-cultural traditions and celebrations - with comments by Prof. Claudia Schwabe

Open book with a story coming out of it

What's in Your Basket?

Focusing on library and schools, the project "What's in Your Basket? - Food in (Grimm) Fairy Tales and Healthy and Beautiful Eating Today" provides didactic materials to enrichen their programs.

Brothers Grimm image

New Grimm Scholars

BGSNA wants to help support and spread the word about new and emerging scholars, who are researching the Brothers Grimm and their fairy tales.

Mystical garden

The Woods We All Walked Through: Fairy Tale Journeys

"The Woods We All Walked Through" is a unique project that aims to collect voluntary stories from individuals about how the Grimm fairy tales have touched their lives and influenced them to this day. You can read below the amazing stories collected so far. Join us in sharing your own and become a part this magical journey through the woods!

THE GOLDEN KEY

“The Grimms and I go way back. I was born in 1980 in Hanau, Germany, and thus share the same birth place as the infamous Brothers Grimm. I like to imagine that I was meant to become a fairy-tale scholar and make a career of “Märchen” (fairy tale in German) because of it. I vividly remember my grandmother Ingrid reading me the Grimms’ fairy tales whenever I had a sleepover at her place. She had a wonderful reading voice and I especially loved listening to her narrating the tale “The Fisherman and His Wife.” In 2017, when she turned 96, I asked her to read me a short snippet of that fairy tale again, which I recorded on my phone. Her storytelling voice, saved now as an artefact in the form of an audio file, is my personal “golden key” that I hold dear. I realize now that it opened for me that little chest full of wonderful things as described by the Grimms because it granted me access to the world of fairy stories. Ingrid passed away in 2022 at the remarkable age of 101. Besides listening to fairy-tale audio plays, attending fairy-tale theater plays, and visiting fairy-tale theme parks (you are exposed to the Grimms’ fairy tales quite a bit when you grow up in the vicinity of Hanau), I was fascinated with the television show The Storyteller by Jim Henderson and fairy-tale retellings in the form of Japanese animated television series. When I was asked later to pick a research field for my PhD studies at the University of Florida, I knew it could only be fairy tales. I wrote my doctoral dissertation about Orientalism in German literary fairy tales or “Kunstmärchen” and attended my first fairy-tale class taught by Dr. John Cech. I was an absolute novice to the academic field of fairy-tale studies. In 2012, it was the 200th anniversary of the Grimms’ fairy-tale collection and, encouraged by Dr. Cech, I gave my first presentations on German fairy tales at Harvard University and at the University of Lisbon, Portugal."

By Claudia Schwabe

JOIN THE PROJECT

Share a short paragraph with us about how the work of the Brothers Grimm or fairy tales in general have had an impact in your life (you can remain anonymous if you wish to)

Thanks for submitting!

Healing Narratives: Fairy Tales for Brave Hearts

The relatively new concept of Narrative Medicine or the Humanities in Medicine has a positive impact on patients and caregivers.

 

Telling stories or fairy tales to a sick child not only prompts the child to tell their story, which is highly valuable for health care professionals, but it also reduces pain and stress and increases oxytocin levels.

Many Grimm fairy tales are about animals, animals that can speak and tell their stories of suffering.Telling fantastic tales removes children – and adult patients – from their own suffering and leads them to imagine other worlds which have a healing result.

There are 200 Grimm fairy tales which lend themselves perfectly for reading to children, because most of them are short stories. The illustrations in many books (e.g., by Jack Zipes, The Original Folk and Fairy Tales of the Brothers Grimm: The Complete First Edition, 2016, or any other edition) could help to determine which story the individual child wishes to hear.​

The BGSNA is looking for partners in pediatric hospitals or homes with sick children.

Calypso book

New Grimm Scholars

BGSNA wants to help support and spread the word about new and emerging scholars, who are researching the Brothers Grimm and their fairy tales.

Are you a Grimm scholar? Contact us and let us help you create a strong network in the field!

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